Behavior Plans: How to Create One and Improve Life at Home

Children have been back to school for over a month and the dreaded phone calls from school have started.  You are distraught and totally emotional.  You are overwhelmed because you know it’s hard to control your child’s emotions and actions.  Especially when they are away from you at school.  Perhaps home life isn’t any better.  Schedules have become increasingly more demanding with homework, projects, and after school activities.  Everyone is a little more stressed.  Behavior plans are a great way to improve your child’s behavior.

Every child would behave appropriately — if they could. Because misbehavior is symptomatic of an underlying disability that’s intensified by situational triggers, behavior plans should more aptly be thought of as teaching plans.  Good Behavior Plans reward children for appropriate behavior and prevent undesirable behavior.  They can be simple and target 1-2 behaviors for preschoolers or they can be used for teens that are highly motivated by rewards like access to a car or money.

Here are some common causes of behavior problems in children:

  • Difficulty regulating their emotions (staying calm when frustrated);
  • Flexible thinking (only one way to do something); and
  • Taking another person’s perspective (it’s my way or the highway).

Behavior plans work.  As a parent you need patience, consistency and the ability to follow through.  You might also need a coach to help guide the way.  A qualified coach can create the appropriate behavior plan and improve your life at home!

Katherine Price coaches parents on everything from behavior modification plans to IEP goals.  She helps DC area parents get the ADHD help and resources they need by guiding them through the options available to them, connecting with the right people, and making a workable, affordable plan for the whole family.  For more information about ADHDC, go to www.ADHDC.com.

Advertisements

Doing the Dance

Image

As our children go back to school, I think about what my relationship will be like with the teacher.  My oldest child is at a new school.  No relationships are formed.  The teachers have no preconceived notions. They don’t know my son.  We don’t know which teachers are a great match for my son.  This makes me feel happy and nervous.  For the last 6 years, the teachers knew my son or me.  They knew he had some “issues.”  I advocated each and every year for what my son needed.  In the last 6 years I never had a problem communicating and advocating.  How, you ask?  No matter how emotional I got, I always treated the teacher with respect and appreciation.  I gave the teacher the benefit of the doubt.  I never tried to do their job.  Being this way pays dividends later!  To me, managing the relationship between yourself and the teacher is like dancing.  Ideally, you and the teacher are on the same “dance floor” moving towards the same goals and communicating in a fluid way.  Don’t ruin the dance by “stepping on the teacher’s toes.”  They may not want to dance with you again.

Katherine Price coaches parents on everything from behavior modification plans to IEP goals.  She helps DC area parents get the ADHD help and resources they need by guiding them through the options available to them, connecting with the right people, and making a workable, affordable plan for the whole family.  For more information about ADHDC, go to www.ADHDC.com.